Black Sesame Waffles

Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food
Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food
Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food
Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food
Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food
Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food
Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food
Black Sesame Waffles // Eat Cho Food

January is a month of fresh starts, juice cleanses, Whole30, Cook90, Marie Kondo purges, and strong gym attendance… for some people. I’m cooking the same tasty and satisfying food I love, which is definitely not compliant by any diet’s standards. I’m refusing to watch the Marie Kondo special, for no particular reason. And I’ve been to the gym a handful times, which I’m actually pretty proud of! I tried to not set too many resolutions for myself this year and just focus on being a happy and productive human bean. That’s a pretty good goal I think!

I do have a few normal and boring general life goals though. This year I think will finally be the year that I become really, LIKE REALLY, organized. I can feel it! Or maybe this is the year I learn to actually make the bed every morning. That would be something. I’m trying, Mom! I’m also trying to make a conscious effort to waste less. That means:

  1. Eating all my vegetables and salad greens before they get gross.

  2. Buying less plastic things. You should have seen how much paper and plastic I purged from our office. OMG. I’m so sorry, Earth!

  3. And using up all the boxes of lasagna noodles we have in the cupboard from when Reuben and I couldn’t decide on the perfect noodles to make the best lasagna.

When you’re a food blogger or even just like a well stocked home cook, you end up with a ton of food products taking up space in your fridge or cupboards. I have SO MANY random bags of various flours and starches. When is the next time I’m going to bake with oat bran???? How many jars of coconut butter is normal? 5? I looked in the fridge a week ago and realized that I had like 4 half full jars of tahini! So I’m trying to work through all the excess things in my kitchen little by little so that I can hopefully reset my kitchen pantry with the necessities. That would be butter, flour, sugar, salt, and oyster sauce.

This recipe for Black Sesame Waffles used up the last bit of black sesame tahini hiding in the far end of my fridge. You know that back corner right by the open box of Arm & Hammer that’s been there since you moved in? That’s where the jar was hiding. I’m honestly surprised that I didn’t use up this jar sooner because I LOVE black sesame everything. Muffins. Cake. Cookies. Sprinkled on 90% of my meals. I’m obsessed. I might even get a black sesame tattoo! JK I won’t ever do that. But a black sesame tattoo would just be like an extra freckle, right?

These waffles are deeply nutty from the black sesame. Almost like peanut butter but 1000000% better. The texture is light but with a nice chew, which I’m all about. You can find black sesame paste or tahini at your local asian or Mediterranean market, Whole Foods might have it, or you can just order it off the internet! You could make it from scratch too! Regular tahini also works if you’re having a hard time finding the black sesame variety. Once you’ve introduced black sesame into your kitchen, these waffles are super easy to whip up in the morning, because I know you don’t want to be separating eggs and whip egg whites to stiff peaks on the verge of a hangry meltdown. You just want to eat! I love topping my waffles with yogurt, but dreamy whipped cream and pomegranates make for a slightly fancy and luxurious breakfast situation. You deserve it. It’s January and you’re already kicking booty!


Black Sesame Waffles

serves 4-6

materials:

2 cups AP flour
1/4 cup white sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
1 1/2 cup greek yogurt
1/2 cup water
2 eggs
4 tbsp melted butter
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/3 cup black sesame paste/tahini

steps:

  1. Combine flour, sugar, salt and baking soda in a large bowl.

  2. Add greek yogurt and water in a medium bowl. Whisk until combined. Add in eggs, butter, vanilla, and black sesame paste. Whisk again until combined. If your black sesame paste is a little thicker you may need to mix a little longer, but a few small chunks of sesame paste is okay!

  3. Add wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon until combined. Avoid over mixing. The batter will be really thick.

  4. Heat up your waffle iron. Fill iron accordingly, so that it does not overflow. I place about 2/3 cup of batter in my waffle iron to make these. Cook until desired doneness (3-4 level for me).

  5. Serve warm with whipped cream, maple syrup, and pomegranates! Or with whatever your heart desires!

Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls

Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food
Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls - Eat Cho Food

Pretty much throughout the entirety of our time in Cleveland, there were spring rolls either being made, freshly baked out of the oven, or in the fridge ready to be reheated in my mom's magical air fryer. Can’t life always be like this? This scenario is not too much different than the fist 10 years of my life, because growing up in your family's Chinese restaurant meant that you could hop on into the kitchen and ask your grandpa to make you an egg roll as an afternoon snack at any moment. I would then proceed to cut the egg roll in half lengthwise, scoop out almost all the filling because cabbage was a scary thing to me in the 90s, and then aggressively cover the crispy and slightly veggie flavored egg roll skin with sweet and sour sauce. Ah, I miss my youth.

You'll notice that I'm switching between egg rolls and spring rolls. That's intentional because during my restaurant life we ate blistery egg rolls, but then my mom would always make crispy and crunchy spring rolls at home. I'm not sure why! Spring rolls have definitely become a staple at our house for whenever we have the whole family over for dinner, a birthday, or a barbecue. In recent years, my mom has adjusted her own recipe and developed a pretty fantastic baked spring roll. The baked version is awesome and still has a great crunch (that’s because my mom goes through the extra effort of squeezing all the liquid out of the cabbage by hand like a superhero)! Since they are baked you end up being able to eat a million of them without feeling like butt afterwards. They are simply filled with chicken and cabbage. I've gotten over my irrational fear of cabbage in the last 18 years, thankfully. I recently helped my mom make spring rolls and we added bean thread noodles. It adds a great texture to the filling and also helps absorb any excess moisture to ensure an earth shatteringly crisp crunch when you bite in without spending your whole afternoon squeezing cabbage. If you can’t find bean thread noodles, which are likely found at your local Asian market, you can omit them and they will taste just as good! You just might have a few less spring rolls to fry up.

The recipe I'm sharing with you guys requires frying the suckers, because I'm ignoring all the "healthy start to the new year" propaganda and I also haven't had a fried spring roll in ages! Oh, it was soooooooo worth it. Baked spring rolls are amazing, but freshly fried ones are incredible and such a treat!

Chinese New Year is also about 3ish weeks away and I feel like it is my duty to fry up all these delicious treats for you guys : ) 


Chicken and Cabbage Spring Rolls

makes 25 spring rolls

materials:

1 small head of green cabbage - shredded

1 1/2 lbs chicken tenders (breast works too)

1 tbsp olive oil

2 tbsp oyster sauce + 1 tbsp oyster sauce

1 heaping tbsp cornstarch

salt

white pepper

1 bundle of bean thread noodles

3 green onion stalks - chopped

1 tsp sesame oil

1/4 water + 1/4 flour

25 spring roll wrappers

oil for frying

steps:

  1. Slice chicken into thin bite sized pieces. Place in a bowl and toss with olive oil, 2 tbsp oyster sauce, cornstarch, pinch of salt, and a heavy dash of white pepper. Allow to marinade for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours.

  2. Heat 2 tsp of oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Add shredded green cabbage and cook for 4-5 minutes until cabbage has slightly softened and the edges are slightly golden. Remove cabbage from the skillet and allow to cool in a large bowl.

  3. With the skillet still on, add about 1/4 cup of water and bring to a boil. Add chicken, stir to evenly disperse chicken. cook in water for 4-5 minutes, stirring frequently. Water should have mostly evaporated by now. Remove chicken, avoiding scooping up any excess water, and add to the bowl of cabbage.

  4. Place bean thread noodles in a heat proof bowl. Pour just boiled water over the noodles until they are fully submerged. Let noodles sit for 2-3 minutes until noodles are cooked. Drain the noodles well. Use a pair of kitchen scissors to cut the noodles into slightly smaller pieces. Add noodles to the bowl of cabbage and chicken.

  5. Season the spring roll filling with another pinch of salt, dash of white pepper, 1 tbsp oyster sauce, and sesame oil. Add chopped scallions and toss everything until evenly combined. Allow the filling to completely cool.

  6. Mix equal parts water and flour to form a paste for assembling the spring rolls.

  7. Place spring roll wrapper on your work surface, positioned like a diamond (see images above). Place about 1/4 cup of filling in the bottom third of the wrapper (closer to you). Fold the bottom tip of the wrapper over the filling and tuck over the sides. Smear a bit of the flour paste around the edges of the wrapper and continue rolling the spring roll tightly. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.

  8. Heat enough oil for frying in a heavy bottom pot or deep skillet. Heat to 360 degrees. Add a few spring rolls into the oil and fry for about 5 minutes until golden brown and crispy. Remove spring rolls from the oil and place on paper towels to remove excess oil. After about a minute, place on a wire rack to allow to cool. Repeat with remaining spring rolls.

  9. Enjoy once cooled to a safe eating temperature with sweet and sour sauce!

Home

Home - Eat Cho Food
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Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food
Home - Eat Cho Food

7 days in Ohio. 1 day in Michigan. It was wonderful, not too cold, and I wish we could have had a few more days at home.

Each year, it gets harder and harder to get back on that plane to San Francisco.

This year more than ever, I’m feeling that pull to move back to the Midwest.

In awe by how smart my brother is and I can’t believe how doctory he sounds after one semester of medical school.

Sometimes, I think he’s really my older brother.

Walked off some Christmas pounds at the park by my parent’s house and learned that I can’t skip rocks to save my life.

So many movies. So much sleep.

Double teaming a classic Italian dinner for the fam with the help of Reuben. Garlic knots are the perfect food.

Grabbed a delicious bite of challah and Korean beef jerky at the West Side Market.

My mom makes such crazy good food. I miss her egg rolls and fried chicken already.

I missed being able to sit down to a normal dinner with my family.

Longhorn Steakhouse is actually a really great restaurant.

We caught up with friends at Masthead Brewery over beers and the most glorious everything pretzel and pimento cheese.

You should stop by Climax, Michigan, re-evaluate your life decisions, and consider buying an old farmhouse to fix up.

Escape Rooms are actually really fun and not as lame as you might think they are.

Family feast after family feast.

Had dinner at our childhood family restaurant, which is now an okay Indian restaurant. It felt small at first and then it started to feel familiar again.

Gosh, I miss home.